The Lehigh and Hudson River Railway



Around the Turn of the (Last) Century






Some miscellaneous images from my collection and others that don't easily fit anywhere else. The time frame covered is roughly 1875 to about 1910.

Thanks to my brother, Jim Feldner, for letting me scan portions of maps in his collection.

They show the railroad in the village of Warwick in 1875 and 1903. It is interesting to note that in 1875 (as the Warwick Valley Railroad, utilizing the Erie's 6 foot gauge and Erie equipment) it only extended as far west as Main Street and the original wood station; at the time it was basically nothing more than a short feeder line to the Erie's main, at Greycourt.

By 1903, as the now fully independent and fully-formed Lehigh and Hudson River Railway, the South Street yards had been added to, and new engine and car servicing and storage facilities had been built (and expanded) below the Elm Street crossing.

Within less than a decade, the current yards and servicing facilities (the ones I grew up with) would be built to replace these facilities...





South Street Yard, left Prior to building the new yard and shop complex in 1910- 1911, the freight yards were in the area now occupied by the municipal parking lots and the Kuiken Brothers (formerly Conklin & Strong) lumber yard on South Street.

This view (possibly taken in 1903) looks toward Main Street. The building at far left is the Demerest Hotel, with the express office of the new station just visible across Railroad Avenue. The freight house beyond still stands.





South Street Yard, right This view, from the same location, looks to the right in the direction of High Street.

The church in the background is the historic Old School Baptist Church, still a landmark in downtown Warwick. The building in the distance beyond the early streetlight is the old Warwick Institute, long gone.

The reason for these photo's having been taken is obvious in this shot. The Wawayanda Creek had overflowed it's banks, rising to above the top of the rails. This degree of flooding has occurred at an average of 25 year intervals over the past century.










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